A Theology of Biblical Counseling: The Doctrinal Foundations of Counseling Ministry Book Review

Nate Brooks

Nate Brooks

Heath Lambert is not naive as to the contrary position he’s espousing in A Theology of Biblical Counseling. The first words of the first chapter declare, “Counseling is a theological discipline. There. If you have continued to read beyond the first sentence, you have already completed the most controversial part of this book” (p. 11). The disagreement between integrationists and biblical counselors has always been largely jurisdictional. Continue reading

Expanding Our Scripture Vocabulary

Lilly Park

Lilly Park

How would you rate your growing knowledge of Scripture? Note that I added “growing” in front of knowledge, because God is more concerned with our growth in the knowledge of Him (Ps. 86:11) than arriving at a level of “I know a lot about the Bible.” Continue reading

Leading Others to the Good Shepherd

Paul Tautges

Paul Tautges

Perhaps the greatest privilege and joy of involvement in the personal ministry of the Word is leading others to the green pastures of safety and security where Jesus, the Good Shepherd, never fails to care for them. Understanding and believing in Jesus as the only Lord and Savior is only the beginning, not the end, of their relationship with God and, therefore, only the beginning of our ministry to them. Yes, the Christian life begins with repentance toward God and faith in Jesus Christ as one’s sin-bearing Savior; however, it continues and thrives most fruitfully as disciples learn to walk humbly with our God by following the Good Shepherd. Therefore, meditating on the loving care of the Good Shepherd for His sheep builds up our faith and equips us to more tenderly care for those to whom He calls us to minister His grace and truth. Listen to how Jesus describes Himself. Continue reading

Why I Wrote “Christian Life Issues, Volumes 1 and 2 – An Exposition and Application of John Bunyan’s Description of the Christian Life as Found in his Book The Pilgrim’s Progress”

Wayne Mack

Wayne Mack

On occasion when people hear that I have written a two volume set of books entitled Christian Life Issues, Volume 1 and 2, based on the Bible and John Bunyan’s classic description of the Christian life, I’ve been asked to explain my purpose for writing these two volumes. My main purpose—as is true or should be true for every Christian in terms of whatever they do— is to magnify the Lord and help people see how glorious He is (1 Cor. 10:31; Rom. 11:36). But the question is, how can we do that? Continue reading

Keeping our Counseling Biblical – Part Two

Andy Farmer

Andy Farmer

In the previous blog we addressed the tendency to drift from biblical counseling to pragmatism and attempts to help people in difficult seasons. I have found that having some reminders to keep me clear-headed and heart-focused in biblical counseling is essential to help keep my counsel biblical. Here are four more reminders that help me stay faithful to the practice of biblical counseling. Continue reading

Ezra 7:10 and the Counselor

Paul Tautges

Paul Tautges

Faithful counselors are conscientious; they exercise great care in guiding others with the Word of God. Additionally, they seek to listen well, speak truth graciously, and rely upon the power of the Holy Spirit to accomplish His transforming work in the hearts and minds of those whom they help. However, as admirable as all of this is, the neglect of our own obedience is a real danger. It is possible to go through the motions, teaching what we know is good counsel while at the same time failing to consider the relationship that our own personal Bible study and daily walk with the Lord have upon the effectiveness of our ministry. For this reason, I’d like us to ponder one simple verse hidden away in one of the books of the Minor Prophets. Ezra 7:10 reads, “For Ezra had set his heart to study the Law of the Lord, and to do it and to teach his statutes and rules in Israel.” Continue reading

The Dynamic Heart in Daily Life

Nate Brooks

Nate Brooks

A question I always want to ask of a book before I spend my time and currency on it is, “Why do you exist?” In a world of expansive publishing, why should I read this particular book on a given subject and not a different book that covers much of the same ground? While much has been written on topics frequently addressed by biblical counselors, Jeremy Pierre’s The Dynamic Heart in Daily Life treads upon ground that has remained relatively undisturbed by the heels of those in the biblical counseling movement. Continue reading

Changing My Definition of Good

Amy Baker

Amy Baker

Like everyone else, I consider myself a busy person. When I’m in the middle of a project, being interrupted to deal with a problem or concern from someone else tempts me to think, “I don’t need this right now.” I see the interruption as a bad thing, and I believe I am being taken away from doing more important work. Continue reading

Is The Bible Taking a Back Seat in Your Counseling

Stuart Scott

Stuart Scott

Biblical counselors would be the first to affirm that God’s Word is the source of our counseling and the Spirit’s agent for change. But are we communicating that in an effective way to our counselees in our actual practice? Are we really depending on the power of God through His Word to arrest, comfort, and transform hearts? Do those who minister in a more informal way in our churches understand the value of pointing to the Word, before they offer an outside resource? Continue reading